How to find and win investors

A no-nonsense, practical online masterclass which provides inspiration on where to find investors, how to get their attention and outlines a proven process for building relationships with investors that deliver investment commitments.

You will:

  • Identify investors within your existing network and beyond
  • Learn what to say to investors so they have the information they need to back you
  • Develop two different types of pitch that you can use to quickly get the attention of investors
  • Discover how to build relationships with investors focused on delivering investment commitments
  • Receive a proven system for managing relationships with investors
  • Practise different techniques for moving investors to an investment decision

The masterclass is live and interactive so that you can ask specific questions and try out different approaches during practical exercises. You will receive focused and practical feedback which is instrumental in improving your communication approach and in building your confidence in front of investors. Places are limited to ensure a good interactive experience.

What people say about the masterclass
“I have felt quite lost in knowing how and what to pitch to investors, and I now feel far more informed. It’s been so valuable to have the content reflected back for me to see what I am not communicating.”

“It was useful to have a complete overview and specific tips about the crowd fundraising process. It’s helped me create some actionable points along with a good overview for the approach.”

Preparation
In advance of the workshop, you will be asked to prepare a 60 second elevator pitch and come ready to present this. Ideally your pitch should:

  • introduce your business by describing the problem you solve for customer
  • outline who your customers are
  • explain what your business has achieved to date
  • detail how much money you are looking to raise and at what valuation
  • and how you will use this investment to grow your business

Duration: 2.5 hours
Location: Online, using Zoom video conferencing
Presented by: Hatty Fawcett, Focused For Business
Fee: £250
Next masterclass: 19th September, 10-12.30pm

Book your place on the next masterclass Book here

About Hatty
Hatty Fawcett is the founder of Focused For Business. She raised two rounds of investment for her own business venture and now supports others in raising investment, predominately through business angels and crowdfunding. She runs a series of online masterclasses, a Fast Track To Funding coaching programme and Crowdfunding Accelerator all of which are designed to make it quicker and easier to raise investment. Hatty also offers  a range of free webinars and Funding Clinics. Hatty regularly speaks on the topic of raising investment and is an active blogger on the subject.

What people say about working with Hatty
“Hatty is a great teacher! The rich content of the course kept me interested and helped me. This course has given me confidence.” Sue Frost, Co-founder Curamicus

“The webinars from Hatty are great but the best bit is the interaction with the other participants and hearing how they are approaching their journey to investment.” David Toscano, Cin Cin Italian Canteen

“Hatty was a fantastic coach helping us create a short pitch, ensuring the delivery of key investor information in a simple but effective way” Gill Hayward, Co-Founder, YUU World

“Hatty’s content was excellent and I learnt far more than I had imagined. We had a good laugh whilst getting some serious work done.” Sharon Maddy-Patel, Maddy Lou Shoes

“Hatty made the daunting process of accelerating my business a simple, outlined and structured process. As a company we have gained direction, professionalism and valuable information through her insights.” Arun Thangavel, Co-Founder, Hollabox

You can read more recommendations on Hatty’s LinkedIn profile.

Book your place on the next masterclass – Book here

See the full range of Preparing for Investment: Online masterclasses

When is the right time to raise investment for your startup?

This might seem an odd question. You go for investment when you need money, right? Wrong! Not only does it take time to raise investment – so you want to start raising investment at least 6 months before you need the money – but there are stages in every business’ life-cycle when it will be easier to raise external investment. Going for investment just because you need the money could mean you’ll waste time and energy. Worse still, the distraction of raising investment may mean your business suffers – making it harder still to raise investment. So, when is the right time to raise investment for your startup?

Hatty Fawcett, Founder of Focused For Business, interviewed two founders who have successfully raised investment in the last year and asked them whether there is a “right” time to raise investment.

Adam Beveridge, Co-founder of Hollabox, started his startup in 2016 and raised investment the same year and went on to raise a second seed round a year later. Hollabox is a social media that makes it easy to see inside the best venues, restaurants and places in real time so you can decide where to go for a great night out.

Sue Frost, Founder and CEO of Curamicus started her startup in 2015 with founder investment and a startup loan. She went on to raise seed investment in 2017. Curamicus provides wearable assistive technology for elders and vulnerable people that detects and reduces the risks of falls.

Hatty: Let’s start with the big question, is there a “right time” for a startup to raise investment?

Adam: This is a tough question to answer, as each business case is subjective and each investor has their own investment criteria. From my experience, I would say the most sought after criteria investors want is revenue from a proven business model.

“The earlier a start-up can prove it will make money, the more this de-risks the investment for the investor.”

The next “expected” criteria, would be a dedicated, full time founding team and a strong vision. A team breaths confidence, a strong vision helps form a path that people want to join you on. It’s a minimum starting point for any venture, I would say.

Sue: I think from a startup point of view it’s best to raise investment when you have a developed true business concept to the point that you’re able to prepare a detailed business plan. Preparing a business plan takes you through the process of self-examination as to the viability of the business for yourself and also clarifies what you’re offering in return for investment.

Hatty: Do you think a startup can go for investment too soon – or leave it too late?

Adam: A start-up can certainly try and raise too early.

“Raising money is so time consuming, to the point that founders can often neglect the core operations of their startup.”

Because of this, you want to make sure when you’ve finally got in front of the right people, and it will take a lot of intros and knocking on doors to get there, you have the right things to say. Otherwise you’ll get a “no” and realise you’ve wasted months of your precious runway.

To avoid wasting time, build credibility with an industry relevant advisory board, make powerful connections and partnerships, (with brands, accelerators and entrepreneurs) and focus on proving your market and concept as cheaply and efficiently as possible before you go for investment. But be wary of leaving it too late or investors may question your startup’s speed to market and scalability.

“The sweet spot is when you think you gathered enough data and evidence on a small scale, to prove there’s potential and a bigger picture.”

Sue: There are different stages to business investment applicable as a business grows.

“Recognise the right stage or type of investment applicable to your business when planning to approach investors.”

Hatty: Thinking about all the times you have raised investment, have you ever found it easier or more difficult to raise investment and what do you attribute that to?

Sue:
“To secure a first investment is challenging. However, once we secured the first investor it made it easier for subsequent investors to consider us.”

From the subsequent investors viewpoint, we had already been through the due diligence process with the first investor and this provided some level of confidence to subsequent investors.

Adam: It’s a lot easier when you already have capital committed, and brands or credible investors on board. Investors take notice of what you’re doing. It was much easier for us to raise when Just Eat invested in Hollabox – it’s a name everyone knows.

“The earlier you try and raise in your businesses life-cycle, the more you risk showing naivety, inexperience and have less proof of concept.”

We tried to raise 3-4 months into the start of our journey. It was too soon. Twelve months later, we had developed, learnt best practices and understood the investor landscape. Our pitches were better, we had a more mature product and a better understanding of our users. That, and a clear road map, meant we successfully raised.

Hatty: As you prepared to raise investment, what were you excited about and what concerns did you have?

Sue: I was excited about the prospect of being able to realise our business dream and bring our product to market so that we could make a difference in people’s lives.

I was concerned at the length of time the financing took as we had to deal with two organisations (three if you include the grant we took) and individual angels. However, I understood the need for due diligence on both sides of each transaction.

“Bringing in third party investors is a big step for any startup. We had to be sure we had the right fit for us as a team”

I needn’t have worried. We’re very happy with the group of seed investors we are working with now. Collectively and individually they are all very willing to help us with our business goals without becoming too involved in the business which is a good balance.

Adam: I was excited about meeting successful entrepreneurs and people who had a vast knowledge of start-ups and business. People who could open doors and give advice. Getting their time was precious, even if it didn’t lead to investment. I found people are willing to help and offer advice, even if they don’t invest.

I was understandably concerned about getting rejected by investors. We received many “nos”. It’s very common for startups on an investment journey but, naturally, the first few always hurt.

“The key with rejections is to quickly use each as a learning curve. Accept that raising capital takes time and keep working smartly to get in front of the right people.”

There’s a book I’d recommend – “Rejection Proof” by Jia Jiang. It helped me develop my investment armour and mindset.

Hatty: Did you have a “lead investor”? Did that make the process of raising investment any harder or easier?

Sue: We did have a lead investor and it was very helpful in the seed round as this provided additional confidence to other investors.

Adam: At first, no we didn’t. We secured a place on a couple of accelerators, including Just Eat. Through this we found a lead investor, the founder and CEO of Tossed.

“The support and connections received from our lead investor where amazing, but also, mentioning the lead investor to other stakeholders and investors, opened doors and made raising from other investors easier.”

Securing a lead investor meant we had terms sheets in place, a committed valuation and share price and a high percentage of investment target committed. That certainly makes raising investment easier.

Hatty: What practical advice or tips would you offer to anyone preparing their business for investment?

Sue: Have a clear idea of how you’re going to make money and what the projected return on investment will be for the investor.

“As an entrepreneur when you have a business idea it becomes very personal to you. Sometimes it’s easy to forget you’re in business to make money.”

Investors are somewhat comforted to see your passion and vision but you also need to know where you want the business to be in 3 – 5 years’ time.

Adam: I would say introductions are key. Investors get hundreds of investment opportunities a week. The way to make sure your start-up stands out is to be introduced by someone the investor trusts. To make sure this happens, build out your network. Become part of networks, accelerators, communities and attend meet-ups. Use your network to ask for introductions.

Don’t just go straight in for “the ask” either. Warm up your contacts with regular progress updates, offer help where you can and show an interest in their own ventures or activity. Reaching out cold is harder and comes across selfish. Help your community, and, when the time is right, it will help and reward you.

Hatty: Do you have any advice or tips on how to maintain your energy, motivation and commitment when raising investment?

Adam: Believe in what you’re doing. You started your start-up because you saw an opportunity and you’re one of the few people that got up and decided to do something about it. Believe that others will see that opportunity too and want to help you. It is draining emotionally and time wise, and the sucker punch is that it doesn’t always have a happy ending.

Sue: In my experience to raise investment requires a lot of energy and it can be exhausting physically. If you’re into exercise then obviously this will help with the stress.

“Keep in mind that this is a phase to your business that is necessary to achieve your longer term goals but it is a temporary period which when achieved will enable you to succeed.”

I’ve met some great people along the way who have encouraged me when I needed it the most for which I’m most thankful.

*****************

Three questions to answer to ensure your business is ready for investment

So you want to raise investment? Rather than leaping straight into action writing a pitch or talking to investors, take a moment and ask yourself three questions.

How much money do you need?
What will you do with the money you raise?
How will your business change and grow as a result?

If you can answer these questions properly – not just in an off the cuff manner – but by providing real detail, facts and figures, then you probably are ready to raise investment.

But the devil is in the detail.

Investors don’t back ideas, hunches or broad-brush thinking. They want proven products (or services), thoughtful plans and evidence to support your approach. These things aren’t just conjured up by brainstorming, desk research and theoretical plans. They are created through action, hard work, persistence and a lot of iteration.

I touted my theoretical business plan around VCs and angels before the penny dropped that I needed to get the business going before anyone would back me.

I learnt that the hard way. I touted my theoretical business plan around VCs and angels before the penny dropped that I needed to get the business going before anyone would back me. The next time I tried to raise investment, (just six months later – but six incredibly busy months) I had not just a web platform but paying customers and a detailed marketing strategy. I raised £150K in one week – from pitching to money in the bank.

The proof was in the pudding. Investors call this “traction” and it speaks lounder than words.

Traction speaks louder than words

Be honest, ask yourself what stage your business is at:

If you have a business idea but nothing tangible yet, don’t waste your time talking to investors. Instead invest your time into creating your product/service/app. It doesn’t need to have all the bells and whistles but it needs to deliver the essence of what customers are looking for. This is often called an MVP or minimum viable product. It allows customers to trial your product, give feedback and for you to understand what needs to change to meet your customers’ needs better.

You don’t have to spend a fortune to develop an MVP. In fact, it’s better if you don’t

How do you fund this? Invest your own money (if you can), talk to family and friends to see if they will lend/invest money or explore a start up loan (but be aware that you will probably have to start making repayments immediately so be sure you can generate revenue quickly or negotiate a repayment free period). You don’t have to spend a fortune to develop an MVP. In fact, it’s better if you don’t – the chances are your MVP will change when you get customer feedback.

If you have got an MVP, focus on getting your first customers – whether they are paying you or not. Being able to demonstrate you can attract paying customers is best, but honest – hopefully positive – feedback can be just as valuable. Work on really understanding your customers – who they are, why they like the product and how you could find and sell to similar customers. This information is gold dust for your marketing strategy. Tried and tested marketing strategies do attract investment.

Work on really understanding your customers…Tried and tested marketing strategies do attract investment.

And then? Well, it’s back to the three questions we started with. To gain investment, you will need to explain in detail how much money you need, what you will do with it and how that will grow your business.

Growth is the key here. Investors don’t want you to stand still. They want you to create value by finding better ways to work, developing new products, attracting more customers. Investment isn’t philanthropy. Investors want a financial gain and that is created when the business grows – fast.

Investment isn’t philanthropy. Investors want a financial gain and that is created when the business grows – fast.

If you’d like to speed up the process of getting investment, it’s worth talking to a professional. Someone who understands the process, someone who has “been there, done that”. Investors are looking for specific information when deciding whether to invest and it pays to get the inside track on what you’ll need to provide – as well as having someone to help you prepare, to challenge you and give practical advice on how to improve your pitch.

If your business is ready for investment, sign up to Fast Track to Funding – designed to save you time and make it quicker to attract investment.

If you’re not sure if your business is ready to raise investment and you want to learn more about your funding options, reserve a free place on the live and interactive webinar “Everything you need to know to raise funding – quickly”

How to succeed at crowdfunding: Free, live and interactive webinar

A free 60 minute, live and interactive webinar presented by experienced crowdfunder Hatty Fawcett, Founder of Focused For Business.

You will discover:

  • How to select your crowdfunding platform to attract the right investors.
  • The 7 essential elements of a successful investment pitch.
  • The secret of crowdfunding (that no one tells you) which is key to success.
  • How to set your crowdfunding target to ensure success – not failure.
  • The inside track on how to off-set risk to attract serious investors.

Places are limited to ensure a good interactive experience.  Please book early to avoid disappointment – scroll down to book.

As the webinar is online, there is no travel time, simply log from your computer wherever you are – all you need is an internet connection and a webcam. A login link will be emailed prior to the webinar.

There is no need to bring anything but please come ready to participate fully. Hatty will share specially prepared content, answer your questions about crowdfunding and give you the opportunity to learn more about the eight week online programme, Crowdfunding Accelerator.

BOOK YOUR PLACE NOW
Click on the “Select a date” link below to see all available dates and times for this webinar and to reserve your free place:

(If your browser does not display the booking form, click here to be re-directed to an Eventbrite booking form).

What people say about this webinar

“A very informative seminar that gave me a much clearer understanding of the different types of crowd funding available and which of these might be most suitable for my business”

“Hatty is a fountain of wisdom when it comes to crowdfunding.”

“Hatty is a great teacher! The rich content of the course kept me interested and helped me understand how crowdfunding fits into various financial offerings.”

“I found your webinar to be extremely helpful and would rate it 10/10”

“It was useful to interact with the others and it’s reassuring to hear your stories of fundraising.”

“I found the webinar useful and, as always, your tone and enthusiasm are very motivating. You would be a great person to work with because of your know-how.”

About Hatty

Hatty Fawcett raised £250,000 through crowdfunding and angel investment for her own business venture. She learnt the hard way what it takes to raise investment and now speeds up the process of getting investment for startups and early-stage businesses. Hatty runs Crowdfunding Accelerator an eight week programme designed to make it quicker and easier for businesses to prepare for crowdfunding. She regularly speaks on crowdfunding and is an active blogger on the subject of raising investment. Hatty is also a Regional Manager for Angels Den and is a Talent Spotter for The Start-up Funding Club.

What people say about Crowdfunding Accelerator

“Hatty is a great teacher! The rich content of the course kept me interested and helped me understand how crowdfunding fits into various financial offerings. This course has given me confidence on how and when to organise a campaign.” Sue Frost, Co-founder Curamicus

The Crowdfunding Accelerator was an excellent way to explore the concept of crowdfunding in a real hands-on and practical way which resulted in having everything I needed to proceed.” Claire Timbrell, Co-founder The MacGuffin Project

“Hatty was a fantastic coach helping us create a short pitch, ensuring the delivery of key investor information in a simple but effective way” Gill Hayward, Co-Founder, YUU World

“Hatty made the daunting process of accelerating my business a simple, outlined and structured process. As a company we have gained direction, professionalism and valuable information through her insights”. Arun Thangavel, Co-Founder, Hollabox

How do you value a startup – in the real world?

The internet is littered with stories of astounding startup valuations, achieved within just a few years of a company’s birth. I think my favourite in recent months is the aptly named Improbable, a UK tech simulation company, which raised $502 million (£390 million) in a funding round in May 2017 at a valuation of over $1 billion, making Improbable a unicorn (a business valued at $1 billion or more). The company was just 5 years old.

Are such valuations the stuff of dreams, make-believe and fairy stories? (Surely that choice of the name “unicorn” isn’t used without irony!) How do you value a startup in the real world?

“A startup needs money. It makes the dream come true.”

Now, don’t get me wrong. I expect a founder to be bullish and full of optimism for their business. No one is going to invest in a business you’re not excited about. The issue here is that investment for early stage businesses is vital. It is literally the lifeblood. It is what enables you to build your prototype, test routes to market, build market understanding and provide the funds for growth. A startup needs money. It makes the dream come true.

“A “deluded valuation” can close doors before you’ve even had a chance to say ‘Hello'”

But, a “deluded valuation” can close doors before you’ve even had a chance to say “Hello, I’m Rumpelstiltskin”. Why would you close doors before you’ve even started a conversation?

Established businesses have it easy. When you’ve got predictable revenues there are numerous ways to assess and measure business value. (If you ever find yourself having trouble sleeping, take a look at this Wikipedia article listing ways to value a business. Startups and early-stage businesses are anything but predictable – they may not even have revenue. In such circumstances, the only business valuation that matters is when two parties agree to buy and sell.

“The only business valuation that matters is when two parties agree to buy and sell.”

But how do you get to that point? Where do you start? How do you evidence your valuation? How do you negotiate to reach agreement?

Startup valuation is a negotiation – but not one that exists in the founder’s head. One that is grounded in fact, displays careful planning and contains a dose of realism.

There is nothing more likely to cause a potential investor to walk away than a business valuation justified in the following was:

“I’ve looked on crowdfunding sites and another company that’s not as good as ours is valued at more”

“That’s how it’s done “in the Valley””

Instead, real world valuation starts with:

  • Facts – that demonstrate what you have achieved in the business and that there really is a market that is willing to buy what you offer
  • Financial forecasting – not “finger in the air” stuff, but grounded spreadsheets that demonstrate a founder’s understanding of market drivers, costs and diversified revenue streams
  • Strong team – the right people with the skills and experience to make the financial forecast a reality
  • Credible exit – which demonstrates not just an attractive return for investors on paper, but a believable route to selling shares so that the return can be realised.

Then, it’s a conversation between grown-ups – exploring assumptions, plans and options. The length of that conversation being tempered by the speed at which the business needs the investment!

By Hatty Fawcett, Focused For Business

*********************************

If you want to learn more about practical business valuation for startups, sign up for the live and interactive online masterclass “How to create a business valuation that gets your startup funded.”

You might also like “How to value your startup: A brief, practical guide.”

Giving you the tools to raise investment: Online masterclasses for start-ups, founders and early stage businesses

This online masterclasses series is designed to give startups the tools and information they need to prepare for investment in a focused, actionable way:

How to write an executive summary that attracts investors
Learn to create an executive summary for business angels or crowdfunding investors that really sells your investment opportunity.
Find out more and book a place

How to create a business valuation that gets your start-up funded
“Real world” business valuation for start-ups and early stage businesses looking to raise angels investment or crowdfunding.
Find out more and book a place

How to find investors and move them from “Doubters” to “Shareholders”
How to find, warm up and close deals with business angels and crowdfunding investors.
Details coming soon

How to pitch your start-up to raise investment
Develop the range of different pitches you will need when raising angel investment or crowdfunding.
Details coming soon

 

 

How to create a business valuation that gets your start-up funded

Business valuation...the most common deal breaker

A down to earth, step-by-step approach to creating a business valuation for start-ups and early-stage businesses looking to raise angel investment or crowdfunding.

You will:

  • Learn what a business valuation is and how it changes over time
  • Become familiar with the terminology used to express a business valuation
  • Discover the evidence you will need to justify your business valuation
  • Understand what investors look for when assessing value in a business
  • Undertake a practical exercise to identify the drivers of revenue in your business
  • See a worked example of a financial forecast
  • Receive a valuation calculator

Places are limited to ensure a good interactive experience.  Please book early to avoid disappointment.

What people say about the masterclass
“This masterclass was an excellent experience. it ticked all of the boxes. The interactive nature of the masterclass ensured that all of the questions I had about my business valuation were answered.” Martin Lewis, Graduate Attire

Duration: 1 hour 45 mins
Location: online using Zoom video conferencing
Presented by: Hatty Fawcett, Focused For Business
Fee: £200

Book your place on the next masterclass

If you can’t see the booking form, book your place via Eventbrite

About Hatty
Hatty Fawcett is the founder of Focused For Business. She raised two rounds of investment for her own business venture and now supports others in raising investment, predominately through business angels and crowdfunding. She runs a series of online masterclasses, a Fast Track To Funding coaching programme and Crowdfunding Accelerator all of which are designed to make it quicker and easier to raise investment. Hatty also offers  a range of free webinars and Funding Clinics. Hatty regularly speaks on the topic of raising investment and is an active blogger on the subject.

What people say about working with Hatty
“Hatty is a great teacher! The rich content of the course kept me interested and helped me. This course has given me confidence.” Sue Frost, Co-founder Curamicus

“The webinars from Hatty are great but the best bit is the interaction with the other participants and hearing how they are approaching their journey to investment.” David Toscano, Cin Cin Italian Canteen

“Hatty was a fantastic coach helping us create a short pitch, ensuring the delivery of key investor information in a simple but effective way” Gill Hayward, Co-Founder, YUU World

Hatty’s content was excellent and I learnt far more than I had imagined. We had a good laugh whilst getting some serious work done.” Sharon Maddy-Patel, Maddy Lou Shoes

“Hatty made the daunting process of accelerating my business a simple, outlined and structured process. As a company we have gained direction, professionalism and valuable information through her insights.” Arun Thangavel, Co-Founder, Hollabox

You can read more about Hatty on her LinkedIn profile.

Book your place on the next masterclass

How to combat loneliness as an entrepreneur

What words do you associate with entrepreneurs and founders?

Ambition?
Passion?
Optimism?
Energy?

Lonely?

Perhaps not the latter. And yet…

At the outset, most entrepreneurs act alone. They have an idea, they research it, develop it, make it happen – on their own.

They are self-reliant – they have to be. In the early days there is often no budget to build a team, there may not be a co-founder to share ideas with, or to moot the relative benefits of this strategic option over another. Entrepreneurs have to trust their own judgement.

Even when the business is able to support a team, founders have to keep a distance between themselves and the team some of the time. There are some things you just can’t share with the team – especially if the thing that is worrying you is “how do I pay the next monthly salary run?”

And yet, as the saying goes, “a problem shared is a problem halved”.

So what’s a founder to do?

There are practical things you can do to combat loneliness:

  • Using co-working spaces can be a good way of ensuring you have people around to talk to.
  • Making time for networking also makes sure you are meeting new people with different perspectives, but beware people’s natural inclination to present a positive picture of themselves which may mean you feel you can’t be as open as you’d like to be in certain circumstances.
  • Working with a coach or mentor can provide an environment for discussing more sensitive, and potentially challenging, situations – but it can become expensive.


Or you could join an online Entrepreneur Board – an intimate group of entrepreneurs whose businesses are at a similar stage to yours, people who get to know you over time, building trust, rapport and understanding of each other’s businesses. It makes for a powerful support option. Not only does it combat loneliness but it is designed to facilitate problem solving, offer support in responding to challenges and in exploring strategic options. You become part of a community, surrounded by experience.

You are not alone, afterall.

******
Find out more about Entrepreneur Boards

How to create an executive summary that attracts investors

A practical, results-focused masterclass that gives you everything you need to create an Executive Summary for business angels or crowdfunding investors that really sells your investment opportunity.

Developed with input and feedback from active investors, you will:

  • Learn to use the 7 Essentials of a successful pitch to structure your Exec Summary
  • Do a practical exercises to describe your business in one succinct sentence
  • Receive a ready-to-use Exec Summary template which investors love
  • Develop a series of “proof points” that show investors you have traction
  • Discover the three most important things to include in your Exec Summary
  • Receive a supporting workbook, additional resources and proven tips

In addition to the live and interactive online masterclass, if you submit your draft Executive Summary (using the template provided in the Masterclass) the course leader, Hatty Fawcett, will conduct a review of this and provide detailed feedback and suggestions for improvement, giving you additional confidence that you have an Exec Summary that will attract investors.

 

Places are limited to ensure a good interactive experience.

What people say about the masterclass
“Booking this masterclass was the best money I’ve spent. I left feeling inspired, more knowledgeable and confident that I had a one page exec summary worthy of any investor table.” Arran Campbell, MyKoolBox

“This masterclass helped me create a successful Executive Summary. Hatty is fun to work with, smart and has a bounty of real-life experience that she generously shared with our class. I have a new, more professional perspective on how to present my company and talk to investors.” Magi Raible, LifeGear Design

Duration: 90 minutes
Location: Online, using Zoom video conferencing
Presented by: Hatty Fawcett, Focused For Business
Fee: £200

Book your place on the next masterclass

If you can’t see the booking form, book your place via Eventbrite

About Hatty
Hatty Fawcett is the founder of Focused For Business. She raised two rounds of investment for her own business venture and now supports others in raising investment, predominately through business angels and crowdfunding. She runs a series of online masterclasses, a Fast Track To Funding coaching programme and Crowdfunding Accelerator all of which are designed to make it quicker and easier to raise investment. Hatty also offers  a range of free webinars and Funding Clinics. Hatty regularly speaks on the topic of raising investment and is an active blogger on the subject.

What people say about working with Hatty
“Hatty is a great teacher! The rich content of the course kept me interested and helped me. This course has given me confidence.” Sue Frost, Co-founder Curamicus

“The webinars from Hatty are great but the best bit is the interaction with the other participants and hearing how they are approaching their journey to investment.” David Toscano, Cin Cin Italian Canteen

“Hatty was a fantastic coach helping us create a short pitch, ensuring the delivery of key investor information in a simple but effective way” Gill Hayward, Co-Founder, YUU World

“Hatty’s content was excellent and I learnt far more than I had imagined. We had a good laugh whilst getting some serious work done.” Sharon Maddy-Patel, Maddy Lou Shoes

“Hatty made the daunting process of accelerating my business a simple, outlined and structured process. As a company we have gained direction, professionalism and valuable information through her insights.” Arun Thangavel, Co-Founder, Hollabox

You can read more recommendations on Hatty’s LinkedIn profile.

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Why crowdfunding is like running a marathon…and how you can make it quicker and easier

The power of crowdfunding is undeniable. The media is full of stories of companies raising large amounts of money in just a few days, hours or even seconds!

Brew Dog raised more than £7 million from three crowdfunding exercises

Just Park raised £3.57 million in 34 days

Mondo bank raised £1 million in just 96 seconds

Looking at these examples you might be forgiven for thinking that crowdfunding is easy.

Let me tell you, it’s not!

Crowdfunding is like running a marathon. It takes months of preparation, a good dose of persistence and a degree of stubbornness that stops you giving up even when the going gets tough.

Most of the hard work for a successful crowdfunding campaign is done before you put your campaign live. As with marathon running, the amount of preparation you do is directly correlated to the result you achieve. There’s a lot to do: From preparing written copy and a video pitch to developing a motivating suite of rewards or business valuation. You’ll need to hone your business or project plan in order that it conveys the essential information investors look for, and you’ll need to tee up potential investors so that the money starts to pour in when your crowdfunding pitch goes live.

In fact, crowdfunding is a full-time job – one that’s usually done alongside your other full-time job – that of running your business or project.

Crowdfunding is not an exact science either. Are you certain the crowdfunding platform you have selected will help you attract the right type of investors? Have you pitched your rewards package at the right level to motivate investors? Would it be better to set a lower crowdfunding target and overfund, or should you aim high from the start?

For many, crowdfunding seems appealing but when you look into the detail of what is needed, crowdfunding moves to the “too hard” pile and the campaign never gets off the ground.

For those that do try, there are many pitfalls and difficulties along the way.

The bad news is that over 50% of crowdfunding campaigns that launch fail to achieve their target.

For this reason, it pays to get professional help. After all, if you do run a marathon chances are you will take on a personal trainer or, at very least, research and adopt a training programme.

Crowdfunding Accelerator, an online programme of workshops and mentoring, is designed to make it quicker and easier to run a successful crowdfunding campaign.

Over 8 weeks, in 90 minute (online) weekly meetings you are guided, step-by-step, through the elements of a successful crowdfunding pitch.  There is specially created content which focuses your effort on the things that really matter, workbooks, easy-to-use templates, helpful tips and motivational advice. It’s like having a personal trainer at your side.

There is no doubt that, if you prepare properly, crowdfunding is a good source of finance. In fact, just as a marathon runner can pretty much tell you the time they will run on race day, so it is with crowdfunding. If you prepare properly you’ll know just how quickly you’ll achieve your crowdfunding target , perhaps down to the last second!

A good way to find out more about Crowdfunding Accelerator is to join a free online, interactive seminar: How to succeed at crowdfunding Book your free place below or find out more here

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