Online Masterclass: Create an Executive Summary that attracts investors

The online masterclass, “Create an Executive Summary that attracts investors” gives you everything you need to create an Executive Summary for business angels or crowdfunding investors that really sells your investment opportunity. During the 90 minute online masterclass, developed with input and feedback from active investors, you will:

  • Learn to use the 7 Essentials of a successful pitch to structure your Exec Summary
  • Do a practical exercises to describe your business in one succinct sentence
  • Receive a ready-to-use Exec Summary template which investors love
  • Develop a series of “proof points” that show investors you have traction
  • Discover the three most important things to include in your Exec Summary
  • Receive a supporting workbook, additional resources and proven tips

In addition to the the 90 minute online masterclass, if you submit your draft Executive Summary (using the template provided in the Masterclass) the course leader, Hatty Fawcett, will conduct a review of this and provide detailed feedback and suggestions for improvement, giving you additional confidence that you have an Exec Summary that will attract investors.

Places are limited to ensure a good interactive experience.

As the meeting is online, there is no travel time to the meeting, simply log onto the meeting from your computer wherever you are. Come ready to participate fully!

***** Book your place here *****

About Hatty

Hatty Fawcett raised £250,000 through crowdfunding and angel investment for her own business venture. She learnt the hard way what it takes to raise investment and is now on a mission to make it quicker and easier for other businesses to access finance through these routes.

Hatty runs Focused for Business and has helped many start-ups and small businesses become “investor ready” and raise investment. She regularly speaks on crowdfunding and is an active blogger on the subject of raising investment.

Hatty is also a Regional Manager for Angels Den, the Business Angel Network and crowdfunding platform and is a Talent Spotter for The Start-up Funding Club. She runs free, monthly Funding Clinics giving businesses the opportunity to discuss their funding requirements in an informal clinic and to receive tailored advice.

What people say about Hatty

“Hatty is a great teacher! The rich content of the course kept me interested and helped me. This course has given me confidence.” Sue Frost, Co-founder Curamicus

“Hatty was a fantastic coach helping us create a short pitch, ensuring the delivery of key investor information in a simple but effective way” Gill Hayward, Co-Founder, YUU World

“Hatty made the daunting process of accelerating my business a simple, outlined and structured process. As a company we have gained direction, professionalism and valuable information through her insights”. Arun Thangavel, Co-Founder, Hollabox

Book your place on the next masterclass

Book you place here

Crowdfunding Accelerator graduates raise almost £400K of investment

Crowdfunding Accelerator graduates raise almost £400K

In the last half of 2016, graduates of Crowdfunding Accelerator raised almost £400K of investment for their businesses proving that crowdfunding remains a good way to raise investment. Crowdfunding Accelerator, an eight week online programme, makes it quicker and easier to prepare for crowdfunding, focusing your attention on the things that really matter.

Find out more about Crowdfunding Accelerator

Join a free online, interactive seminar: How to succeed at crowdfunding and get a taste of what Crowdfunding Accelerator is likeBook your free place below or find out more here

New crowdfunding regulation could make it harder to get accepted onto a crowdfunding platform

The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) which regulates both peer-to-peer lenders and equity crowdfunding platforms has announced that it plans to introduce more regulation to protect potential investors and help them understand the risks of investing via crowdfunding.

Areas likely to come under scrutiny include:

  • more prescriptive requirements on the content and timing of disclosures
  • better management of conflicts of interest
  • improved standards of due diligence and
  • enhanced client assessment rules.

These changes could lead to new eligibility requirements for companies wishing to crowdfund and greater scrutiny of their businesses plans and forecasts, making it harder for businesses to be accepted onto equity crowdfunding platforms. It is also possible that crowdfunding pitches will require greater validation in order that risks can be more accurately assessed and reported.

Read the FCA’s an assessment of new rules for crowdfunding

Want help with your crowdfunding application and campaign? Learn how Crowdfunding Accelerator makes successful crowdfunding quicker and easier

“Crowdfunding enabled us to turn a shared vision into a tangible financial commitment” says Robert Woodford, Marketing Director for Deep Time Walk

Schumacher College in Dartington, South Devon seeks to inspire, challenge and question people as co-inhabitants of the world. They are an international centre for nature-based education, personal transformation and collective action. They offer a range of residential courses on ecological themes and transformative courses for sustainable living.

A number of co-creators from the college developed the Deep Time Walk App which provides a walking audio history of the living Earth, giving people a detailed and dramatised experience of the planet’s 4.6 billion year history.  During this educational walk, people walk a distance of 4.6 kilometres whilst listening to the Earth’s story (via the app) and are encouraged to connect their own short-lived experience of time on Earth with the vast expanse of geological time.

The college needed funds to complete development of the app and with revenue generated from the sale of the app hopes to raise sufficient investment to fund a number of bursaries for the college. On World Earth Day in April 2016 they set out to raise £21,000 on reward-based crowdfunding site, Crowdfunder.co.uk.

robert-woodford-from-vision-to-financial-commitment-websiteHatty Fawcett, experienced crowdfunder and Founder of Focused For Business and Crowdfunding Accelerator, asked Robert Woodford to share what he learnt from this crowdfunding campaign and to offer advice to others thinking about doing crowdfunding.

“Schumacher College has a strong alumni who share the Deep Time Walk ethos and vision for the world…it was a project born out of the work of the college and it was natural for us to reach out to this pre-existing community for support”

Hatty: What attracted you to crowdfunding?

Robert: Schumacher College has a strong alumni who share our ethos and vision for the world. Many of our alumni had undertaken the physical Deep Time Walk at the College (from which this project arose) and so had a strong affinity for the project. It was natural for us to want to talk to this pre-existing “crowd” (via a mailing list of 17,000 people) and share our vision. Crowdfunding enabled us to turn a shared vision into a tangible financial commitment of support for our project.

“It proved crucial to have advice upfront …we would have missed out if we hadn’t had all the elements of the campaign lined up well in advance.”

Hatty: How did you approach your crowdfunding campaign?

Robert: We did a wide review of best practices associated with crowdfunding and spoke to a number of people that had already managed a campaign, including yourself Hatty – your advice helped us think about the common pitfalls involved in the process of crowdfunding. The team at Crowdfunder were also a great help in providing support and advice both before and during the campaign. It proved crucial to have this information and advice upfront because, once live, the campaign moved very fast and we would have missed out if we hadn’t had all the elements of the campaign lined up well in advance.

I have to say, it was tough work and enduring attention to detail was needed in the weeks up to launch and then constantly throughout the campaign. Gruelling but rewarding!

“Crowdfunding takes longer than you might think. It’s gruelling but rewarding!”

Hatty: How long did it take to prepare your crowdfunding campaign?

Robert: We starting thinking about our campaign six months before we went live, and then planning started in earnest three months before. Crowdfunding takes longer than you might think. We’d expected to launch about a month before we actually did. It was the right decision to delay the launch as it meant we had everything lined up and, importantly, we secured upfront financial commitments which ensured the campaign was a success.

“The biggest challenge was getting the timing of these pre-pledges lined up with the actual day our crowdfunding campaign went live.”

Hatty: How much of your campaign target had you had promised by the time you put your crowdfunding campaign live?

Robert: We had about 20% ready to be pledged before we went live. The biggest challenge was getting the timing of these pre-pledges lined up with the actual day our crowdfunding campaign went live, and then timing the push out to the wider support base after this.

“One thing that worked really well for us was having incentives that were, effectively, limited edition.”

Hatty: What advice, tips or successful tactics would you offer to anyone preparing for crowdfunding?

Robert: Planning is essential – I can’t stress that enough– as is keeping the momentum going throughout the campaign.

One thing that worked really well for us was having incentives that were, effectively, limited edition. The rewards were also of high value to our target base for support. We made exclusive audio recordings with Satish Kumar, Martin Shaw and Stephan Harding, and provided an set of lectures which totalled over 4 hours. We also have put in the effort to produce an exclusive book and audio cd, which was attractive to potential supporters. And, we would only release a certain number for each reward category and when these were taken, that was it, they were gone. This encouraged people that visited our crowdfunding campaign to pledge, there an then, whilst they were on the site. If they’d waited the reward might have run out.

We used several tactics here:

1) We kept the number of each reward low so that people were encouraged to pledge before a reward ran out.

2) We offered an incentive that the first 50 people that pledged would receive access to an early version of the product, which really helped bring in the early pledges.

3) Half way through the campaign, we launched a match-fund campaign, which brought in a substantial mid-boost to our crowdfunding campaign. It worked so well it enabled us to add stretch targets which provided further momentum to the project.

“We launched a match-fund campaign…and what started as a £1,000 commitment became an £8,000 investment.”

Hatty: How did the match-fund incentive work?

Robert: Essentially, I got three donors in place who each promised to contribute a relatively large sum if we raised matching funding through the crowdfunding site. It was difficult getting the first major donor but, once we had one on board, it was easier to encourage others. The first donor offered a commitment of £1,000 if we could match it through the crowdfunding site. I then got a commitment of a further £3,000 from another two donors. This created a theoretical match-fund pot of £4,000. All we had to do was raise the same amount of money through our “crowd” and that would trigger the match-fund investment. Our wonderful “crowd” came up with the goods on the same day we told them of the initiative! So, what started as a £1,000 commitment became an £8,000 investment. In fact, we actually went over the target amount before the match-fund was pledged and so we pushed on to reach towards our stretch target. Originally we’d hoped to raise £21,000 but we actually raised over £26,000.

Match-funding really incentivised our crowd and our match-funders were excited by it too. They felt they were doing something special which boosted support generally.

“We’re no longer a team of eight, but a community of 267 with a common passion and commitment to the project”

 Hatty: Would you do crowdfunding again?

 Robert: Yes, it’s an exhilarating if sometimes stressful ride, and it was wonderful to be part of a project that not only delivered the investment, but also has the potential to change people’s perspective on their place in the cosmos and how Earth formed over 4.6bn years.

Perhaps even more importantly, we’ve created a growing community around this project. And that’s more compelling than the app on its own. We’re no longer a team of eight, but a community of 267 with a common passion and commitment to the project and it’s potential to give anyone, anywhere on the planet a perspective of deep time and where they came from”. If we nurture this relationship there are lots of opportunities down the line to do other things.  Now, that’s exciting!

To find out more about the Deep Time Walk, visit deeptimewalk.org or join them on their facebook page at www.facebook.com/deeptimewalk

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Crowdfunding Accelerator is an eight week online programme that makes it quicker and easier to be successful at crowdfunding. Find out more

Crowdfunding Success: “Momentum is the key to crowdfunding success” says Peter Ramsey, founder of Movem

Movem, the online community marketplace for landlords, agencies and tenants to list and review rental properties, raised £200,000 on crowdfunding site Crowdcube in just ten days (in August 2016). The investment allows Movem to expand into the residential lettings market, growing the business significantly.

Picture of Hatty Fawcett

Peter Ramsey, Founder of Movem

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hatty Fawcett, experienced crowdfunder and Founder of Focused For Business and Crowdfunding Accelerator, asked Peter to reflect on the process of crowdfunding and share his learnings.

“I loved the idea of having emotionally and financially invested brand advocates.”

Hatty: What appealed to you about crowdfunding?

Peter: I loved the idea of having 100+ brand advocates who are emotionally and financially invested in our product.

Hatty: Did you consider any other forms of investment?

Peter: We considered raising funds privately, including business angel investment. However, I felt Movem needed to make a mark on the industry – which is exactly what crowdfunding helped us to do.

“Crowdfunding isn’t easy – you’ve got to create momentum but that requires hard work.”

Hatty: How easy did you find the process of preparing for crowdfunding?

Peter: Developing a crowdfunding campaign took a lot of time. It probably took me 2 months from making the decision to do crowdfunding to going live. The hardest thing for me was the video pitch. I knew it had to be good, but I didn’t know anybody that could help me make one. So I did it myself. I rented camera gear, got a tripod and filmed/edited the whole thing on my own.

I wasn’t actually that happy with the final cut, but I couldn’t get any more footage, so I had to put up with what I had. On the positive side, that did stop me re-filming again and again. The guys at Crowdcube were very supportive too.

Hatty: If someone is considering crowdfunding, what advice would you offer them?

Peter: My biggest piece of advice is you need to recognise that crowdfunding isn’t easy. There’s a lot of work and effort that goes on behind the scenes. For example, I’d raised some of our investment target prior to putting our crowdfunding campaign live. That was hard work and took time, but it was really important in creating momentum for our crowdfunding campaign when it did go live. That’s the key really, demonstrating momentum.

“I’d wake up at 7am every day and spend the whole day contacting as many people as I could. Literally until I went to bed!”

Peter: Even once you’ve gone live you have to keep that momentum going. You have to keep talking to everyone you think might be an investor. I’d wake up at 7am every day and spend the whole day contacting as many people as I could. Literally until I went to bed! I used everything available to me. LinkedIn, email contacts, the press, friends of friends, Facebook adverts…you name it. I tried it. Crowdfunding is a numbers game – and that requires persistence and hard work.

Hatty: What percentage of your crowdfunding target had you raised before you put your crowdfunding campaign live?

Peter: I had raised £85,000 so just over 40% of our target.

Hatty: Is there anything you would do differently, knowing what you know about crowdfunding now?

Peter: I’d probably be a bit more ambitious. I spoke to so many people during the course of our crowdfunding campaign, there was a ground swell of support and momentum. So many people got in touch afterwards that we could have easily funded £500k.

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Crowdfunding Accelerator is an eight week online programme that makes it quicker and easier to be successful at crowdfunding. Find out more

Why crowdfunding is like running a marathon…and how you can make it quicker and easier

The power of crowdfunding is undeniable. The media is full of stories of companies raising large amounts of money in just a few days, hours or even seconds!

Brew Dog raised more than £7 million from three crowdfunding exercises

Just Park raised £3.57 million in 34 days

Mondo bank raised £1 million in just 96 seconds

Looking at these examples you might be forgiven for thinking that crowdfunding is easy.

Let me tell you, it’s not!

Crowdfunding is like running a marathon. It takes months of preparation, a good dose of persistence and a degree of stubbornness that stops you giving up even when the going gets tough.

Most of the hard work for a successful crowdfunding campaign is done before you put your campaign live. As with marathon running, the amount of preparation you do is directly correlated to the result you achieve. There’s a lot to do: From preparing written copy and a video pitch to developing a motivating suite of rewards or business valuation. You’ll need to hone your business or project plan in order that it conveys the essential information investors look for, and you’ll need to tee up potential investors so that the money starts to pour in when your crowdfunding pitch goes live.

In fact, crowdfunding is a full-time job – one that’s usually done alongside your other full-time job – that of running your business or project.

Crowdfunding is not an exact science either. Are you certain the crowdfunding platform you have selected will help you attract the right type of investors? Have you pitched your rewards package at the right level to motivate investors? Would it be better to set a lower crowdfunding target and overfund, or should you aim high from the start?

For many, crowdfunding seems appealing but when you look into the detail of what is needed, crowdfunding moves to the “too hard” pile and the campaign never gets off the ground.

For those that do try, there are many pitfalls and difficulties along the way.

The bad news is that over 50% of crowdfunding campaigns that launch fail to achieve their target.

For this reason, it pays to get professional help. After all, if you do run a marathon chances are you will take on a personal trainer or, at very least, research and adopt a training programme.

Crowdfunding Accelerator, an online programme of workshops and mentoring, is designed to make it quicker and easier to run a successful crowdfunding campaign.

Over 8 weeks, in 90 minute (online) weekly meetings you are guided, step-by-step, through the elements of a successful crowdfunding pitch.  There is specially created content which focuses your effort on the things that really matter, workbooks, easy-to-use templates, helpful tips and motivational advice. It’s like having a personal trainer at your side.

There is no doubt that, if you prepare properly, crowdfunding is a good source of finance. In fact, just as a marathon runner can pretty much tell you the time they will run on race day, so it is with crowdfunding. If you prepare properly you’ll know just how quickly you’ll achieve your crowdfunding target , perhaps down to the last second!

A good way to find out more about Crowdfunding Accelerator is to join a free online, interactive seminar: How to succeed at crowdfunding Book your free place below or find out more here

book onto a free online taster session. Sign-up here to receive details of the next taster session.

Crowdfunding Accelerator: Making successful crowdfunding quicker and easier

Crowdfunding Accelerator: An online programme of workshops and mentoring

** Free online, interactive seminar: How to succeed at crowdfunding – Book your free place below or find out more here **

 


The harsh truth is that 50% of crowdfunding pitches fail to reach their funding target. Crowdfunding Accelerator is an eight week ONLINE programme designed to make it quicker and easier for you to run a successful crowdfunding campaign. The programme:

  • takes a step-by-step approach, focusing your effort on the things that really matter
  • provides specifically prepared content focused on each aspect of your crowdfunding campaign
  • supports you with programme workbooks, handy-to-use templates, additional resources and proven tips
  • encourages peer learning, support and motivation through a closed Facebook Group
  • facilitates the actions needed to prepare your campaign through weekly “homework”
  • culminates with “Pitch School” where each participant pitches their campaign and receives tailored feedback
  • significantly improves your chances of crowdfunding success

What participants say about Crowdfunding Accelerator

“Hatty is a great teacher! The rich content of the course kept me interested and helped me understand how crowdfunding fits into various financial offerings. This course has given me confidence on how and when to organise a campaign.” Sue Frost, Co-founder Curamicus

“Hatty made the daunting process of accelerating my business a simple, outlined and structured process. As a company we have gained direction, professionalism and valuable information through her insights”. Arun Thangavel, Co-Founder, Hollabox

“The Crowdfunding Accelerator was an excellent way to explore the concept of crowdfunding in a real hands-on and practical way which resulted in having everything I needed to proceed.” Claire Timbrell, Co-founder The MacGuffin Project

“You have really helped me address my ideas and improve my plans. The support has met my expectations which were high”. Adalberto Battaglia, Founder Quinto Quatro

“I’ve found your feedback on the homework assignments most helpful. It feels like personal tuition.” Sue Frost, Co-founder Curamicus

“The homework is by far the best bit! It’s what made this so much more practical than just researching crowdfunding on your own, because you end up with everything you need to proceed. Even if you don’t proceed, the homework definitely focuses you on what is important for your business.” Claire Timbrell, Co-founder The MacGuffin Project

“Hatty was a fantastic coach helping us create a short pitch, ensuring the delivery of key investor information in a simple but effective way” Gill Hayward, Co-Founder, YUU World

Dates for the next programme

The next Crowdfunding Accelerator runs on Wednesdays from 13.00-14.30 BST on the following dates:
May – 10th, 17th, 31st
June – 7th, 14th, 21st, 28th
July – 5th

Location
This is an online programme delivered weekly in 90 minute interactive video call meetings. There is no need to travel. Simply log in from your computer (with internet access) wherever you are.

What next?

Join a free online, interactive seminar: How to succeed at crowdfunding and get a taste of what Crowdfunding Accelerator is likeBook your free place below or find out more here

Got questions about the programme? EMAIL HATTY

Want to join the next cohort of Crowdfunding Accelerator: BOOK YOUR PLACE NOW

 

About Hatty
Crowdfunding Accelerator is run by experienced crowdfunder Hatty Fawcett. Hatty raised £250,000 through crowdfunding and angel investment for her own business venture and for the past 5 years she has helped business owners prepare for and raise investment. She learnt the hard way what it takes to raise investment and is on a mission to make it quicker and easier for other businesses to access finance.

Hatty regularly speaks on crowdfunding and is an active blogger on the subject of raising investment.

Hatty is also a Regional Manager for Angels Den, the Business Angel Network and crowdfunding platform, is a Talent Spotter for The Start-up Funding Club and an Ambassador for Phundee. She runs free, monthly Funding Clinics giving businesses the opportunity to discuss their funding requirements in an informal clinic and to receive tailored advice.

 

 

Five Funding tips for your small business or start-up

Every business needs to raise investment to grow and make the most of opportunities at some point.

When I ran Seek & Adore (an online market place) I raised investment twice. Each time it felt like a rollercoaster ride. I had to learn the hard way what it takes to raise investment. I was recently asked if I had any advice to offer entrepreneurs and business owners going through the process of raising investment. I offered five tips that served me along the way.

Read the full blog post on LinkedIn

Why your executive summary is your most important investment document

*** Book a place on the masterclass “How to write an executive summary that attracts investors” ***

When seeking investment for your business (or, for that matter a social enterprise or creative project) it pays to think like an investor, giving an investor the information they want rather than telling them everything you want to say.

The most important document when you first start talking to investors is your “one-pager” or executive summary. I don’t literally mean an executive summary that summarises your business plan, but rather a short, specifically written document that summarises your investment opportunity and acts as a calling card when approaching investors and angel networks. It is best to keep this to one page.

Why keep it short and sweet?

Investors (especially the serious ones) are very busy people. They have lots of potential investment opportunities hit their in-box every week. Most investors will make up their mind in less than five minutes whether your business is of interest to them.

“You have to give investors the information they want quickly and succinctly to be in with a chance of getting their attention.”

So how do you get the attention of an investor in just a couple of minutes?

The key is to give then what they want! Whilst individual investors will have their individual “sweet spot” for investments, in assessing an opportunity all investors are looking for certain key information:

  • A brief, no nonsense description of what the business is and does.
  • An explanation of the market opportunity – the problem you solve for your customers, the size of the market and the share of the market you feel you can realistically address.
  • An overview of your customers – who they are, any different groups of customers and how you find new customers.
  • How your products and services differ from the competition (and rest assured there will be competition whether you recognise it or not so, please, don’t say there is no competition!)
  • What you’ve achieved to date – investors look for businesses that are already delivering on their business model so highlight key milestones in your company’s development.
  • An introduction to your management team – who the key personnel are; their skills and experience and what they have achieved in the past.
  • Details of your business model – how you make money and whether you have a number of different revenue streams.
  • Your financials – revenues achieved to date, as well as a forecasting growth expected over the next 3-5 years.
  • Details of the investment you are looking for – how much money you want to raise, what you will do with that money and how much equity you are selling in return for the investment.
  • Oh, and don’t forget to add your contact details. If you do “hook” your investor you want him or her to be able to contact you quickly and easily to discuss the opportunity in more detail.

Think of getting a meeting with a potential investor like applying for a job

A good executive summary does the job of a strong CV. It helps you stand out from the crowd and ensures you get called for interviewJust as when you are applying for a job the first step is to get an interview. You’ll review the job description and tailor your CV to demonstrate how you are the right person for the job. So it is with an executive summary.

A good executive summary will position the investment opportunity so that it piques the interest of potential investors and gets you that all important first meeting. When you meet you can go into much more detail, and start to assess whether you want the investor on board. The discussion and negotiation really starts – but that’s another blog.

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Book a place on the masterclass “How to write an executive summary that attracts investors”

and receive detailed advice on what to include in an executive summary, a ready-made template that investors love and a free review of your executive summary.

Reserve a place on a Funding Clinic to talk about your funding options
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What’s in a good investment pitch?

When raising investment for your small business, you have to be ready to pitch at any moment. Anyone you meet could be an investor. It could be the person standing next to you on the bus, someone you meet at a networking event or party or even someone you play sport with in your spare time.

Depending on the circumstances you may not have long to pitch. In some cases you might only have a minute to get your business across (the classic “elevator pitch” scenario), whilst in a more formal pitch environment (such as at an angel network pitch evening) you might have 15 or 20 minutes. Certainly, you won’t always have a Powerpoint presentation. You have to be ready for any eventuality.

So what should be in your business pitch?

A good place to start is with the business concept. What is it your business does? What problem are you solving for your customers? Even in a 20 minute pitch you don’t have long (and there are other things you need to talk about in addition to your products and services) so keep your explanation short and to the point. Focus on the key points and what makes your product/service different. If you are talking about your product/service for more than 25% of the length of your pitch than you are probably going into too much detail.

Next up, talk about sales. What’s your business model and how do you generate revenue? Investors love to hear that you have more than one revenue stream and that you have experimented with different routes to market and identified the most successful channels. Ideally you are looking to show that you’ve hit upon a selling formula that delivers predictable results and is ready to be scaled up.

Businesses don’t make themselves. It is people who make businesses successful. You must introduce yourself and your team in your pitch. You’ll want to talk about the team’s background, skills and experience. Leave the investor in no doubt that you have the right mix of people to drive this business forward.

Your team should start to build your credibility in the eyes of an investor but you want to cement this by talking about your business achievements to date. Highlight any key milestones you have achieved: Key strategic partnerships you have formed, contracts you have won and revenues in the bank. Your pitch needs to demonstrate that you are already delivering results, even without the investment.

No pitch is complete without some numbers. If you are already revenue generating share what monies you have banked. Forecast future revenues (realistically – no one will believe “pie in the sky” numbers) and be clear about your margin and breakeven. Be specific about how the money you raise will be used, and provide revenue and profit predictions for the point at which you plan to exit the business. You must have an exit plan. Investors will want their money back at some point. Without an exit they don’t get a return!

Finally, be clear about how much equity you are selling in return for the investment. An unrealistic valuation can ruin an otherwise brilliant pitch. For advice on valuing your business, download my e-book.

Given you need to be ready to pitch at the drop of a hat, and that you can’t always rely on a Powerpoint presentation to help you remember everything you want to get across, you might find it helpful to have this little mnemonic in your mind to make sure you cover the main points. It’s based around the middle letters of the alphabet:

Image showing what's in a good pitch
Oh, and one final thing, be sure to pitch with passion! If you’re not excited by your business why should an investor get excited? Pitch with energy and enthusiasm and remember to smile and make eye contact.

Good luck!

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If you would like help in developing your investment pitch, contact me , Hatty Fawcett, to book a phone call.

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